Articles Posted in Parenting Agreements

The term “nesting” is used to describe an arrangement where the children remain in the family home while the divorcing parents take turns living in the family home and in another location. (The parents move in and out of the home rather than the children moving between homes.) Nesting is an option that some parents consider as a transitional parenting arrangement because they  want to keep the children’s living arrangements in place for a period of time during and/or post divorce.  In practice, nesting is something that requires cooperation and communication from both parents, and careful consideration should be given before nesting is used. Continue Reading

Many parents come to mediation wanting a 50/50 parenting schedule.  That usually means that both parents are concerned about maintaining a strong relationship with the children once Mom and Dad separate. Shared parenting is usually a positive experience when the parents cooperate to create a workable plan that respects the bond between both parents and each child.  Continue Reading

Taking trips with the family post-divorce should continue to be a fun, memorable experience regardless if it’s a day trip or longer.  Moving forward, most families benefit when the parents work out a concrete plan for how vacation time will be spent with the children. This helps to create stability and certainty in making vacation and travel plans and in the children’s lives.  Continue Reading

The divorce process is an emotional time. Tensions surrounding a parenting plan may mount even when both parents prioritize the needs of the children.  Responsiveness, stability, and practicality are significant factors in developing a parenting plan. As parents begin to develop a parenting plan, the need for flexibility is also very important in creating options that consider the child first.  Continue Reading

I recently posted a blog focusing on the Brad Pitt/Angelina Jolie divorce, specifically that the collaborative law process may be beneficial for the couple. In addition to the general benefits of the collaborative process and how they may be applied to the Pitt/Jolie divorce (the previous blog can be viewed here), the Brangelina case is also an excellent candidate for collaborative law because of the children.  Continue Reading

When constructing a parenting plan, the goal is that both parents maintain a meaningful relationship with the children.  When parents live in separate homes, a special challenge is presented in preserving the relationship between children and both parents after divorce or separation.  When parents put aside their conflict and work together to find a parenting schedule that works for the whole family, whether it is a 50/50, 60/40 or some other type of plan, everyone usually benefits from the sharing of care.  Continue Reading

Just a few days ago, social media was trending with its usual celebrity gossip and sports news, but an interesting family law case in Michigan snuck into the mix. A judge in Michigan sent three children to juvenile detention for refusing to have lunch with their father (if you haven’t had a chance to read the story, click here). As a collaborative lawyer who tries to help clients avoid hostile court battles, this story especially peaked my interest. After seeing much commentary and debate on the situation, I gave some thought to my own take on the story.

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I have written in the past about co-parenting and why it is important to have a unified front when raising children. While there are many different ways that parents can develop a united front, there are certain things that can be helpful to everyone. Parenting plans are ways for parents to actually put into writing how they will go about handling different types of decisions when it comes to the children. It is possible to provide children with continuity and security when the children reside in both Mom’s house and in Dad’s house.
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hand-holding-1-912758-m.jpgThe term ‘co-parenting’ has almost become a buzzword that appears in different magazines and in segments by celebrity doctors and specialists on television. Co-parenting is essentially what it sounds like – parents sharing the responsibilities and duties of raising their child. Co-parenting comes into play when the parents are not in a relationship with one another – whether separated, divorced, or never having formalized the relationship.

Using a carefully thought out co-parenting plan helps parents create a unified front in terms of taking care of and relating to the children. Many parents are able to set aside their own conflict and act as a team for the sake of the children. This seems incredibly reasonable and understandable, but the question remains: How can parents actually form this united and unified front?
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Blog -winter-snow-storm-2.14.2014.jpgA simple Internet search of “National Divorce Month” will result in a stack of articles discussing how lawyers encounter a heavy volume of calls right after the holidays, giving January the unfortunate moniker of ‘National Divorce Month.’ 2014 has been no different. Last month we once again saw divorce attorneys writing about how the phones began to ring off the hook once the holiday season officially ended. On the surface, it makes sense. Many couples choose to prolong beginning the divorce or separation process until after the already busy and stressful holidays are over. It can be especially difficult for couples with children, because parents are hesitant to interrupt the child’s holiday with news of a divorce. Many people tend to look at the New Year as a “fresh start” and a chance to begin again, so choosing to begin the divorce process in the New Year seems like the best alternative.

Is there ever really a “right” time to initiate a divorce or separation? Many articles written about January divorces point to the many reasons why people choose to begin the process at that time, and why it makes sense to wait until after the holidays. The most important thing, though, is for the spouses to evaluate their own marital life and family. Several of my blogs have made mention of the fact that every family is different and thus, every divorce is also different. This rings true no matter what the highest divorce month may be.

The decision to divorce or separate is an important one, to say the least. Every couple has considerations to keep in mind before deciding if divorce is the right path to take. In making an assessment of the marital life as well as family life, couples should make sure to have open and honest communication, and not rush the process. Some couples find it helpful to sit down with a couples’ counselor or mediator in order to really get everything on the table. A very important aspect of assessing the situation is to become educated on all of the options available. Taking an active role in decision-making is helpful in reaching decisions about what to do.
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